Asheville Weather Workers’ Traditional Weather Harvest Festival 2018 Photos

What a Beautiful Day of Weather, Ceremony and Celebration!

In our spiritual tradition that originates with the Nahua people of the Central Highlands of Mexico, the six local quiatlzques (workers with weather on the behalf of our village) invite people from all walks of life who live in the Asheville area to a Traditional Weather Harvest Festival each year. This year, on Saturday, October 6, 56 people attended, from age 1 to 80s, and the festivities were full and fun, with drumming, dancing, traditional offerings, friendship, heartfelt prayers and the presence of Sun, Clouds, Wind and, just as we were packing up, a beautiful, gentle Rain to add to the celebration. To learn more, explore our website www.ashevilleweatherworkers.org

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As people began to arrive for our annual Harvest Festival, where we celebrate the Rain, Clouds, Wind, Lightning and Sun in an ancient and timeless way, the clouds arrived, as well. In our experience, by sharing our gratitude for the Harvest with the elemental forces of Weather, we continue an important cycle of relationship between the human people and the Weather Beings.
After all, our farmers' abundant harvest feeds the people of the Asheville area, and without balanced weather, the food they grow and raise would wither on the vine. Because of that critical and beautiful dance of Rain and Sunlight, our area is rich and abundant with food and clean water to support everyone who lives here.
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asheville weather workers Adam Erin
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As the ceremony and festivities ended and we packed up the last decorations to take them home, the heavy clouds that had gathered to celebrate with us rewarded us with some gentle Rain. A perfect ending to a rich and emotional day of community and sacred connection!
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How I Feel About Technological Answers to Today’s Problems like Climate Change

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Those ways, both for trees and human people, that have worked in the past are sublimely suited to this world that we share. Those ways are successful because, over countless years, these interrelationships have been naturally established.
By Erin Everett

A few weeks ago, I got into a discussion with my old friend, a long-time environmentalist. He made clear that sustainable solutions for today’s problems of environmental degradation, like climate change, will come from more and more advanced human-created technology.

I admit that I’m generally of a different opinion.

If our human mind has gotten us into the pickle we’re in, doesn’t it follow that we need some help? Where is the wisdom we’re seeking? Someone’s got to know how to solve the problems that more and more growth, production, industry, technology have gotten us into.
When I go for a walk outside, I experience ancient trees in a beautiful, balanced relationship with the ants that crawl up their bark, the lichens that make their home there, the rain that falls and the sun that shines on them. I learn from more recent modern scientific discoveries something that ancestral people have said before: forests, trees, streams, sky, mountains and more are interrelated in a way that shows a special livingness. Plants host a type of awareness that enables them to protect each other, nourish each other, support each other and die with something that seems like grace.
Where is this wisdom and balance for my human brothers and sisters? Is it just for plants, weather and animals? Or is there a way for us humans to find balance, too?
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Where is this wisdom and balance for my human brothers and sisters? Is it just for plants, weather and animals? Or is there a way for us humans to find balance, too?
Our culture as modern people seems to have a different trajectory than what’s going on with the trees, stones, and the other animals in how they are in the world. For example, you won’t find a tree saying to its neighbors, “I know! Let’s create a new way of photosynthesizing that will innovate the food market!”
Those ways, both for trees and human people, that have worked in the past are sublimely suited to this world that we share. Those ways are successful because, over countless years, these interrelationships have been naturally established. When we speak in these terms regarding what we learn, and when we conserve for a good future, we call that wisdom, which represents something similar to those tried and true ancient tree-ways.
When I went to Mexico for the first time, I brushed up against village people who were living in similar ageless ways, the tried and true ones that have worked for millennia for human beings. As I return to those vibrant, dynamic villages, I continue to learn a great deal. These are not wealthy people, trying to make their lives more comfortable by the minute. Instead, they live simply and sometimes ruggedly, with lots of relationships with others who have their backs. They learn relationship skills early, in order to ensure that they will be taken care of well and can care for others.
And, how do they interact with the divine natural world? At certain occasions of the year, when the feeling of those living, natural times of intersection are near, such as the begin-rain time or the begin-corn-planting time, they put their time, comparably meager resources, and energy into celebrating and honoring those key relationships through ceremonies, engagements with the world around them to which nature responds in turn. And for them, the ceremonial cycles are like breathing. Why would you cut yourself off from your exchange with the world that happens when you receive oxygen from the plants around you? Why would you refuse to exhale the carbon dioxide that is needed by other living creatures and which is your natural exchange for the gifts you’ve received?
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What’s a good way to show our appreciation to the living world for the abundant harvest?
My brush with ceremony on that first trip south changed me. It was hard to integrate with the world-view that I had been taught. But, as the years have gone by, this work, like the ancient but ever-relating dance with life has become as welcome and natural as my breath.
So, back to my old friend. He seems to be saying that more technology will solve things like climate change. After all, in his mind, without technology, what do we have?
My response is that technology is our reaction to something missing in our lives. It seems like we need to build something artificial, like an artifact, to solve a problem. However, these solutions often produce new problems which then need additional solutions, and so forth. What if we go back to something tried and true by seeing that some things may not need artificial solving? Maybe we need to just understand “nature” and therefore move into relationship with it as those sustainable and wise cultures did before. I find, like the elders, that this works amazingly well.
And if you would like to experience this, please join us at our annual Traditional Weather Harvest Festival on Saturday, October 6 at Sacred Fire Asheville. My husband, Adam, and I, along with my fellow quiatzlques (ones who work with weather for the benefit of their people) who are part of this time-honored tradition from indigenous Mexico are hosting this event. We will be celebrating the rains and the bounty these great living expressions as wind, clouds, lightening, sun and rain have produced through the bounty of crops and water for drinking.
This event is free, kid-friendly, and open to all. And it is our birthright to be in good relationship with the living, aware world around us. When our dance with the world is a joyful, coordinated one, our fields and farms thrive and our people are fed and live together in good community once again.
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Spring ceremonies at our ancestral home, Casa Xiuhtecuhtli, in central Mexico
Learn more about our Harvest Festival, including what to bring to offer back to the Weather Beings, who have been so kind to us this year. When you want to share true, practical sustainability, the simple act of giving thanks makes all the difference.
Erin Everett and her fellow quiatzlques are taught and initiated in the Nahua weather working tradition from the central highlands of Mexico. They work during the year asking for beneficial weather for the Asheville and western NC area, and they return to their spiritual homeland in Mexico every year to renew their connections. Their fall Harvest Festival is an opportunity for people from all walks of life in the Asheville NC, USA area to join them in celebrating the weather and the harvest.
Learn what to bring to our upcoming Harvest Festival, and invite your friends and family to this free event. Donations to support our work are appreciated.
Learn more about our tradition and our teacher.

Adam’s invitation to the 2018 Harvest Festival

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What would our farmers do without abundant rain to grow food for our community?
On October 6, 2018, join us to celebrate the weather and the bountiful harvest! This is an event where people of all walks of life can gather and celebrate. The 6 people in the Asheville NC area who have been initiated and are committed to the path of the quiatzlques, or Nahua-tradition weather worker, are hosting our annual Traditional Weather Harvest Festival. This year’s leader, Adam Laufer, has been a worker with the weather of the Asheville area since 2003.
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Adam Laufer
Says Adam,
“Gratitude is the root of our well-being. Come celebrate a non-commercialized Thanks Giving and give offerings to the weather beings for their continued presence in our lives.
Even if you are going through a rough patch in your life or feel the fear so evident in our modern age, this simple ceremony of gratitude can change the course of how you interact with the world on a daily basis.
I invite you to come participate in this Nahua ceremony that has been continued for thousands of years to see what the act of giving thanks can do.”
Learn what to bring to our upcoming Harvest Festival, and invite your friends and family to this free event. Donations to support our work are appreciated.
Learn more about our tradition and our teacher.

Join us for our Traditional Weather Harvest Festival on Saturday, October 6, 2018!

Participate in an Original Way of Celebrating the Harvest

Asheville weather workers Harvest Festival

What is the traditional Nahua quiatlzques (“bringer of water” or “weather worker”) Harvest Festival about?

First of all, it’s for everyone, no matter your faith or non-faith, tradition or non-tradition. This type of celebration is for all human beings. Led by Asheville-area folks who have been initiated, trained and steeped in an ancient way of interacting with the world, it’s an opportunity for the people of Asheville and western North Carolina, from all walks of life, to join together and celebrate the bountiful harvest in the very old-fashioned way of our ancestors.

Who should we thank for the abundant rain and its dance with the sunlight? How should we show our appreciation for the rich soil that has blessed us with food for our tables this season and always?

In our Nahua tradition—a living, unbroken spiritual lineage with its center in the Central Mexican Highlands—the answer is as crystal-clear as the rain that has blessed our land this season. Since the Rain, Thunder, Wind, Sun, Clouds and Earth are so generous in bringing us the nourishment we need, we look forward each fall to this Harvest Festival, where all attending take a moment out of our busy lives to celebrate and thank them.

If you look back in history, all of our ancestors had reciprocal relationships with the living world around them.

That includes both the Cherokee and other ancestors who lived on this land and each of our own great-great-great-great grandparents in our bloodlines. Living on the land in their communities, they intimately knew the Sky who brought the Rains so the food plants and animals would grow healthy to feed their village. These were the most practical of people, not distracted by technology or global events. They knew that, if their relationships with the Weather were ignored, their villages would lack the basic human needs that would ensure their survival and thriving. For us human beings, today as it has always been, our well-being depends on good relations with the living community of beings.

In a world of reciprocal relationships, when human beings once again remember their place in the cycles of life, does Climate Change have a place?

Perhaps the pendulum swings of hot/cold, flood/drought and species destruction around us today can be seen as a reaction, in a way, to an imbalanced relationship between human beings and the living world. We’re waking up to realize: we depend on the help of the Weather. The Rain, Sun, Clouds and Wind can be seen as benefactors whose generosity allows our lives to continue.
The good news is that beginning to turn the tide can be easy and lots of fun: it doesn’t take much effort on our parts to lend our voices and hearts to being grateful for the inherent wisdom and balance expressed by the natural world. That’s what our Harvest Festival is all about: a traditional celebration and giving-back to the living world around us for our lives, for our harvest, for the nourishing food and clear water that we human beings cannot produce ourselves.

We all benefit from the abundance of the world. So, please join us on October 6 to give thanks, in a simple and ancient way, to “all our relations.”

Details and directions to our Harvest Festival >

Learn more about our teacher and our Nahua spiritual lineage. >
Meet Casa Xiuhtecuhtli, our spiritual home in Mexico. >